HOW TO LOOK AT THE WORLD (LIKE AN ARTIST) Every artist gets asked the question, "Where do you get your ideas?" The honest artist answers, "I steal them." How does an artist look at the world? First, you figure out what's worth stealing, then you move on to the next thing. That's about all there is to it. When you look at the world this way, you stop worrying about what's "good" and what's "bad"--there's only stuff worth stealing, and stuff that's not worth stealing. Everything is up for grabs. If you don't find something worth stealing today, you might find it worth stealing tomorrow or a month or a year from now. "The only art I'll ever study is stuff that I can steal from." --David Bowie NOTHING IS ORIGINAL The writer Jonathan Lethem has said that when people call something "original," nine out of ten times they just don't know the references or the original sources involved. What a good artist understands is that nothing comes from nowhere. All creative work builds on what came before. Nothing is completely original. It's right there in the Bible: "There is nothing new under the sun." (Ecclesiastes 1:9) Some people find this idea depressing, but it fills me with hope. As the French writer André Gide put it, "Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But, since no one was listening, everything must be said again." If we're free from the burden of trying to be completely original, we can stop trying to make something out of nothing, and we can embrace influence instead of running away from it. "What is originality? Undetected plagiarism." --William Ralph Inge Excerpted from Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You about Being Creative by Austin Kleon All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.